Artificial eye: Researchers combine metalens with an artificial muscle

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens, that is essentially a flat, electronically controlled artificial eye. Artificial eye automatically stretches to simultaneously focus and correct astigmatism and image shift. The research is published in Science Advances. To build the artificial eye, the researchers … Continue reading “Artificial eye: Researchers combine metalens with an artificial muscle”

Stanford researchers develop stretchable, touch-sensitive electronics

Stanford researchers have set the stage for an evolution in electronics by taking the concept of ‘artificial skin’ to the next level, demonstrating not only a stretchable circuitry that can feel the touch of a ladybug, but a manufacturing process to mass produce this circuitry “Research into synthetic skin and flexible electronics has come a … Continue reading “Stanford researchers develop stretchable, touch-sensitive electronics”

New wearable device for the throat

A groundbreaking new wearable designed to be worn on the throat could be a game changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation. Developed in the lab of Northwestern University engineering professor John A. Rogers, in partnership with Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, the sensor is the latest in Rogers’ growing portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise … Continue reading “New wearable device for the throat”

Researchers advance CRISPR-based diagnostic tool, develop miniature paper test

The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool’s power, and has developed a miniature paper test that allows results to be seen with the naked eye — without the need for expensive equipment. The work, led by researchers from the Broad Institute of … Continue reading “Researchers advance CRISPR-based diagnostic tool, develop miniature paper test”

Rice scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboard

Rice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene (LIG) have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour, which once turned Girl Scout cookies into graphene, is investigating ways to write graphene patterns onto food and other materials to quickly embed conductive identification … Continue reading “Rice scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboard”