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Google Doodle celebrates Alice Paul’s 131st Birthday

Written on:January 11, 2016
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Alice Paul’s 131st Birthday

MIT engineers designed Stretchable hydrogel electronics, the Band-Aid of the Future

Written on:December 10, 2015
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A stretchable, smart, hydrogel wound dressing includes temperature sensors and drug-delivery channels and reservoirs, embedded in a robust hydrogel matrix. Mock drugs can be released at various locations on demand, based on the measured temperatures.

Huawei reveals New Smartphone Battery that Charges 10 Times Faster

Written on:November 19, 2015
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hu battery

Stanford researchers develop new way to measure crop yields from space

Written on:November 11, 2015
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stanford cropyield

Sonic ‘Tractor beam’ can lift Objects without touching them.

Written on:October 30, 2015
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tractor beam

Alphabet Announces Third Quarter 2015 Results of Google

Written on:October 23, 2015
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Cornell researchers create artificial foam heart

Written on:October 22, 2015
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a) Fluid pump as cast, b) fully assembled fluid pump after applying external inextensible shell, c) X-ray fluoroscope of pump when left chamber is uninflated (left) vs. inflated (right), d) schematic of pump operation.

Newly launched mobile eye-test device could lead to prescription virtual-reality screens.

Written on:October 20, 2015
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MIT-EyeNetra-1_0

Stanford engineers create artificial skin that can send pressure sensation to brain cell

Written on:October 16, 2015
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Stanford chemical engineering Professor Zhenan Bao and her team have created a skin-like material that can tell the difference between a soft touch and a firm handshake. The device on the "golden fingertip" is the skin-like sensor developed by Stanford engineers.

Researchers use engineered viruses to provide quantum-based enhancement of energy transport.

Written on:October 15, 2015
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Rendering of a virus used in the MIT experiments. The light-collecting centers, called chromophores, are in red, and chromophores that just absorbed a photon of light are glowing white. After the virus is modified to adjust the spacing between the chromophores, energy can jump from one set of chromophores to the next faster and more efficiently.

Courtesy of the researchers and Lauren Alexa Kaye