Google shows Doodle for 200th Anniversary of Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Today (December 20, 2012) Google is showing a Doodle for celebrating 200th Anniversary of Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

 

Brothers Grimm

 

The Doodle is created by showing more than 20 slides which can be shown one by one by clicking Back and Forward arrows buttons.

These Slides tell entire story of “Little Red Riding Hood” or “Little Red Cap”

The story revolves around a girl called Little Red Riding Hood, after the red hooded cape she wears. The girl walks through the woods to deliver food to her sick grandmother.

A mean wolf wants to eat the girl but is afraid to do so in public. He approaches Little Red Riding Hood and she naïvely tells him where she is going. He suggests the girl pick some flowers, which she does. In the meantime, he goes to the grandmother’s house and gains entry by pretending to be the girl. He swallows the grandmother whole, (In some stories, he locks her in the closet), and waits for the girl, disguised as the grandma.

When the girl arrives, she notices that her grandmother looks very strange. Little Red then says, “What a deep voice you have,” (“The better to greet you with”), “Goodness, what big eyes you have,” (“The better to see you with) “And what big hands you have!” (“The better to hug you with”), and lastly, “What a big mouth you have,” (“The better to eat you with!”) at which point the wolf jumps out of bed, and swallows her up too. Then, with a fat full tummy, he falls fast asleep.

A lumberjack, however, comes to the rescue and with his axe cuts open the wolf, who had fallen asleep. Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother emerge unharmed. They fill the wolf’s body with heavy stones. The wolf awakens and tries to flee, but the stones cause him to collapse and die.

Source: Wikipedia.

The Brothers Grimm (Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm) were German academics, linguists, cultural researchers, and authors who together collected folklore. They are among the most well-known storytellers of European folk tales, and their work popularized such stories as “Cinderella” (Aschenputtel), “The Frog Prince” (Der Froschkönig), “Hansel and Gretel” (Hänsel und Gretel), “Rapunzel”, “Rumpelstiltskin” (Rumpelstilzchen), and “Snow White” (Schneewittchen).

Brothers Grimm

The popularity of the Grimms’ collected folk tales endured well beyond their lifetimes.

The tales are available in more than 100 translations and have been adapted to popular Disney films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Sleeping Beauty, and Cinderella.

 

Author: Rajamanickam

Rajamanickam is the Founder of QualityPoint Technologies which runs this RtoZ.org News Site.